KarlSwartz.com/pets
Return to Index



Roxie

Roxie came to us on July 23, 2016. Roxie was about 2 y.o. when we got her. Friends of ours found her running loose in town, and both we and they made considerable effort to find her owners, but with no luck. They were unable to keep her and, since we had recently lost our Billi, they asked us if we might adopt her.

I am going on a rant here: Roxie had a collar, but no tags, and she was not chipped. If you love your pet, these simple precautions are cheap and easy. Microchipping costs about $20, and adding a tag to their collar costs practically nothing. If you get their rabies shot, clip that tag on; it contains information that can be traced back to you through your veterinarian. While microchips can be registered directly to you, most pets are returned home because they had a simple tag showing their owner's name and phone number. This is not hard to do, if they have a collar add a tag! We have returned animals to their owners because they had a tag; and also very sadly taken some to the shelter because they did not.

Roxie appears to be a mix of spaniel and perhaps Australian shepherd. She is a little larger than our Lexus, but about the same weight. She has many mannerisms that remind us of our Billie: she perks up her ears when we get her attention (Billie is the only cocker I have ever seen to do that), she crosses her front legs when lying down, she is exceptionally friendly and gentle. I find myself naturally calling her "Little One" as I did Billie, even though she is larger than any of our dogs.

Roxie has heartworm, which could have been easily prevented had her former owners simply given her the preventative. Another rant: I suspect they may have neglected this because it is so damn expensive, this is a multi-billion dollar scam. Ivermectin is very inexpensive for farm animals, but outrageously priced for pets. The manufacturers know that farmers can't / won't pay so much, but pet owners are gullible marks. Google "heartworm" and educate yourself about this parasite. Then shop Amazon or eBay or your local farm store, where you can purchase this medicine at a reasonable price. You may have to calculate the proper dose, but there are online references also to help you do this. As for Roxie, we are giving her the "slow kill" treatment (Google also), instead of the highly dangerous and traumatizing arsenic shots. Although she tested positive, she shows no symptoms and we are hopeful that she will eventually be heartworm free. (UPDATE! One year later, Roxie tests heartworm free!)

(pics to follow soon, hopefully!


Photos Copyright © 2009 Karl & Marita Swartz
Website Copyright © 2009, 2020 Karl W Swartz